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Unveiling grandeur of Sahyadris

Climate & Biodiversity | Sep 29, 2005

MAGNIFICENT”, “awe-some”, “breathtaking” are the words which come to mind if you happen to take in the vision the Malabar coast of Southern India along the Arabian Sea, wherein lies a range of mountains known as the Western Ghats or Sahyadris.
One can’t but marvel at the painstaking effort of Kamal Bawa, a professor in Massachusetts and co-author Sandesh V Kadoor, an internationally acclaimed photographer, in bringing out a coffee-table book titled ‘Sahyadris: India’s Western Ghats — A Vanishing Heritage’.
The book, released by Nandan Nilekani and Rohini Nilekani, a unique endeavour of the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and Environment (Atree), not only highlights the beauty and incredible diversity of life in the mountain stretch in the form of pictures but also includes nuggets of information about this little-known region in peninsular India.

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